Matsudaira Tadakiyo

松平忠清

Takenoya-Matsudaira

Mikawa Province

Matsudaira Tadakiyo

Lifespan:  Tenshō 13 (1585) to 4/20 of Keichō 17 (1612)

Other Names:  Mannosuke (childhood)

Rank:  daimyō

Clan:  Takenoya-Matsudaira

Bakufu:  Edo

Domain:  Second lord of Yoshida

Lord:  Tokugawa Ieyasu → Tokugawa Hidetada

Father:  Matsudaira Iekiyo

Mother:  Tenkeiin (daughter of Hisamatsu Toshikatsu)

Siblings:  Tadakiyo, Kiyomasa

Wife:  [Formal] Daughter of Kamei Korenori

Matsudaira Tadakiyo served as a daimyō during the Azuchi-Momoyama and early Edo periods.  Tadakiyo was the seventh head of the Takenoya-Matsudaira family and served as the second lord of the Yoshida domain in Mikawa Province.  The Takenoya-Matsudaira were an illegitimate branch of the Matsudaira clan founded by Matsudaira Moriie, the eldest son of Matsudaira Nobumitsu.

Tadakiyo was born as the eldest son of Matsudaira Iekiyo, the first lord of the Yoshida domain.  His mother, Tenkeiin, was the daughter of Hisamatsu Toshikatsu. She was the younger sister (of a different father) of Tokugawa Ieyasu.

In 1610, following the sudden death of his father, Iekiyo, Tadakiyo inherited the headship of the Takenoya-Matsudaira family.

In the fourth month of 1611, after completing a visit to the Imperial palace and traveling to his home in Sunpu, Tokugawa Ieyasu chose to travel on a sea route.  On 4/23, the vessel on which Ieyasu rode departed from Atsuta in Owari Province but, owing to strong headwinds, could not make progress so did not venture into the open seas.  On 4/25, the ship drifted ashore at Muro on Mikawa Bay.  Seeking a place to rest, Ieyasu and his party went to Yoshida Castle.  Fortunately, Tadakiyo and his family were able to quickly prepare to receive the visitors.  On 1/13 of the Keichō 17 (1612), Ieyasu went to Mikawa and stayed again at Yoshida Castle.  On this occasion, he was traveling from Sunpu to Kira in the Hazu District for a falconry expedition.  At this time, he gave Tadakiyo 100 pieces of silver for hosting his stay.  During his return from the expedition, Ieyasu also stayed at the castle on 2/3.

Just two months later, on 4/20, Tadakiyo suddenly fell ill and died at the age of twenty-eight.  He did not have a designated heir so the Yoshida domain lost its standing.  Nevertheless, in view of the prior contributions by the Takenoya-Matsudaira family, the Edo bakufu  granted a fief of 5,000 koku to Matsudaira Kiyomasa, the younger brother (of a different mother) of Tadakiyo.  This was located in Nishi-no-kōri in the Hoi District of Mikawa.  He then served in the role as a direct retainer of the Edo bakufu with the rank known as kōtai-yoriai – these were hatamoto who resided on an alternating basis in Edo and their home provinces.