Hachitsuka Uemon-no-jō

蜂塚右衛門尉

Hachitsuka Clan

Bushō

Hōki Province

Lifespan:  15xx to 8/8 of Eiroku 7 (1564)

Rank:  bushō

Title:  Lieutenant of Outer Palace Guards of the Right Division

Clan:  Hachitsuka

Lord:  Amago clan → Mōri clan → Amago clan

Father:  Hachitsuka Tanba-no-kami

Hachitsuka Uemon-no-jō served as a bushō during the Sengoku period.  He was the fourth head of the Hachitsuka clan and served as the lord of Ebi Castle in the Hino District of Hōki Province.  In one account, his real name is identified as Yoshimitsu.

Uemon-no-jō was born as the son of Hachitsuka Tanba-no-kami, the third head of the Hachitsuka clan.

Originally, he was affiliated with the Amago clan.  In the early Eiroku era (1558 to 1570), after the influence of the Mōri clan extended into the Hino District, Uemon-no-jō began to collude with the Mōri.  In the eleventh month of 1562, the family of Honjō Tsunemitsu of Iwami Province was suddenly purged by the Mōri, whereupon, along with other bushō in Izumo and Hōki, Uemon-no-jō returned to the service of the Amago.  After reverting to the Amago, he worked from his base at Ebi Castle to hinder the movements of the Mōri army.  In the seventh month of 1563, he prevented the Mōri from sending additional forces to Kawaoka Castle and blocked the deployment of Yamana Fujiyuki from Shōyama Castle.

At the beginning of 1564, however, bases of the Amago including Chōdaiji Castle and the Tema fortress were toppled, as the Amago were gradually encircled by the Mōri army.  Some of Uemon-no-jō’s retainers urged him to surrender to the Mōri, but he refused and holed-up in the castle instead.  In the eighth month, Ebi Castle came under attack by forces led by Sugihara Morishige (the lord of Odaka Castle) and Yamada Mitsushige.  Uemon-no-jō resisted, but could not withstand a fierce onslaught by the Mōri including arquebus fire.  Uemon-no-jō, along with family members, killed himself in the castle.  This brought to an end the residence of the Hachitsuka clan in Ebi Castle for a period of eighty years.